What Is A Blog – Weblog Structure Described

Published: 09th March 2009
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Websites that are created to maintaining published information in a chronicle order are called weblogs. "Blog" is an abbreviation of the same. It's usually an online information management system. Many owners of such sites focus on specific topics such as web design, blog design, web hosting, gardening, sports etc. They range from hobbies to products or services that one needs to share or market to other like minded online visitors.



Most blog systems have similar structures. However some like wordpress are much y have is:

1. First is the content area, this is where the publisher puts the content that the weblog viewers will see when they visit. It usually has a way of arranging articles In categories, either from newest to oldest, older to newest or randomly.

2. The other feature of most blogs is ability to organize old articles by date, month or year. This allows easy navigation to older articles.

3. What makes weblogs hit over other types of websites, is its ability to allow visitors to communicate with the publisher by allowing people to leave comments and suggestions at the end each article.

4. Weblogs also has a feature that allows one to easily display other related links on its blogroll. This allows the owners to publicize other websites as well while still maintaining a clear and uniform webpage outlook throughout.

5. Most blogs have other features called feeds. These allows visitors to subscribe to your blog and receive alerts when new content is added on your site

Other free blog systems like wordpress have greater features like trackbacks and ping backs. All these make your blogging an easy and fun to do and still earn some good money from it.



Sullivan Pau is a web Consultant and Webmaster at Syspag Studios ,A company offering web/blog design,web/blog hosting and SEO Outsourcing services.Rate this article and read more Internet Technology articles at More Blogging tips .

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